Category: ‘Death Penalty’

Bryan Stevenson on THE DAILY SHOW with JON STEWART

October 17, 2014 Posted by suefairview

Did Rick Perry Have An Innocent Man Executed? YES HE DID!

August 4, 2014 Posted by suefairview

From Joe.My.God.:

“Even though 41 inmates have been exonerated by DNA evidence since he took office, Rick Perry says he has no trouble sleeping.”

Cameron Todd Willingham was executed in Texas in 2004 for allegedly setting a fire that killed his three young daughters 13 years earlier. He always claimed his innocence, and the arson investigation used to convict him was questioned by leading experts before Willingham was executed. Since 2004, further evidence in the case has led to the inescapable conclusion that Willingham did not set the fire for which he was executed. The Texas Forensic Science Commission issued its report on the convictions of Cameron Todd Willingham and Ernest Willis on April 15, 2011 recommending more education and training for fire investigators and implementing procedures to review old cases.

NEWS BROKE YESTERDAY THAT THE JAILHOUSE SNITCH WAS COERCED INTO GIVING DAMNING TESTIMONY AGAINST CAMERON TODD WILLINGHAM.

TEXAS EXECUTED AN INNOCENT MAN.

Read about it here.

End the Death Penalty Now!

July 30, 2014 Posted by suefairview

Horrible news from the Washington Post:

Federal review stalled after finding forensic errors by FBI lab unit spanned two decades

Basically, 10 people at the FBI testified about hair and fiber analysis prior to DNA test availability and thus errors were made as hair analysis has an unknown error rate.

The inquiry includes 2,600 convictions and 45 death-row cases from the 1980s and 1990s in which the FBI’s hair and fiber unit reported a match to a crime-scene sample before DNA testing of hair became common. The FBI had reviewed about 160 cases before it stopped, officials said.

The investigation resumed after the Justice Department’s inspector general excoriated the department and the FBI for unacceptable delays and inadequate investigation in a separate inquiry from the mid-1990s. The inspector general found in that probe that three defendants were executed and a fourth died on death row in the five years it took officials to reexamine 60 death-row convictions that were potentially tainted by agent misconduct, mostly involving the same FBI hair and fiber analysis unit now under scrutiny.

Here are more excerpts from the article:

I see this as a tip-of-the-iceberg problem,” said Erin Murphy, a New York University law professor and expert on modern scientific evidence.

“It’s not as though this is one bad apple or even that this is one bad-apple discipline,” she said. “There is a long list of disciplines that have exhibited problems, where if you opened up cases you’d see the same kinds of overstated claims and unfounded statements.”

Worries about the limitations and presentation of scientific evidence are “coming out of the dark shadows of the legal system,” said David H. Kaye, a law professor at Penn State who helped lead a Justice Department-funded study of fingerprint analysis and testimony in 2012. “The question is: What can you do about it?”

Responding to the FBI review, the accreditation arm of the American Society of Crime Lab Directors last year recommended that labs determine whether they needed to conduct similar reviews, and New York, North Carolina and Texas are doing so.

According to a Justice Department spokesman, officials last August completed reviews and notified a first wave of defendants in 23 cases, including 14 death-penalty cases, that FBI examiners “exceeded the limits of science” when they linked hair to crime-scene evidence.

However, concerned that errors were found in the “vast majority” of cases, the FBI restarted the review, grinding the process to a halt, said a government official who was briefed on the process. The Justice Department objected in January, but a standoff went unresolved until this month.

After more than two years, the review will have addressed about 10 percent of the 2,600 questioned convictions and perhaps two-thirds of questioned death-row cases.

The department is notifying defendants about errors in two more death-penalty cases and in 134 non-capital cases over the next month, and will complete evaluations of 98 other cases by early October, including 14 more death-penalty cases.

In reality, there is no accepted research on how often hair from different people may appear the same. The FBI now uses visual hair comparison to rule out someone as a possible source of hair or as a screening step before more accurate DNA testing.

Bolding is mine. So many people imprisoned on faulty/false evidence is just mind-boggeling. Not to mention that people were executed on such false evidence as well; at least 4 people were executed or died on death row, were innocent.

This one essential flaw of the death penalty;  it is a permant and irretrievable action. Once done, it cannot be undone.

EXECUTE JUSTICE, NOT PEOPLE!

08wright27A1377530896

Cleveland Wright, 55, of the District, falls into thought at Resurrection Church of God in Christ on Aug. 17, 2013 in Washington. Wright seeks to clear his name after serving more than 27 years in prison after DNA tests exonerated his co-defendant in two 1978 murders. (Jahi Chikwendiu/The Washington Post)

Santae Tribble-Washington, DC

Santae A. Tribble, left, shown with his son Santae Jr. in 2011, spent 28 years in prison for a murder he didn’t commit. (Mark Gail/THE WASHINGTON POST)

Read the entire article here.

Oklahoma botches execution & Study: 1 in 25 death row inmates is innocent

April 30, 2014 Posted by suefairview

Clayton Lockett  Huffingtonpost

 

Oklahoma Botches Clayton Lockett’s Execution

 

McALESTER, Okla. (AP) — Oklahoma prison officials halted an inmate’s execution after a new drug combination left the man writhing and clenching his teeth on the gurney. He later died of a heart attack.

Clayton Lockett, 38, was declared unconscious 10 minutes after the first of three drugs in the state’s new lethal injection combination was administered Tuesday evening. Three minutes later, he began breathing heavily, writhing, clenching his teeth and straining to lift his head off the pillow.

The blinds were eventually lowered to prevent those in the viewing gallery from watching what was happening in the death chamber, and the state’s top prison official eventually called a halt to the proceedings. Lockett died of a heart attack a short time later, the Department of Corrections said.

“It was a horrible thing to witness. This was totally botched,” said Lockett’s attorney, David Autry.

The problems with the execution are likely to fuel more debate about the ability of states to administer lethal injections that meet the U.S. Constitution’s requirement they be neither cruel nor unusual punishment. That question has drawn renewed attention from defense attorneys and death penalty opponents in recent months, as several states scrambled to find new sources of execution drugs because drugmakers that oppose capital punishment — many based in Europe — have stopped selling to U.S. prisons and corrections departments.

Defense attorneys have unsuccessfully challenged several states’ policies of shielding the identities of the source of their execution drugs. Missouri and Texas, like Oklahoma, have both refused to reveal their sources and both of those states have carried out executions with their new supplies.

Tuesday was the first time Oklahoma used the sedative midazolam as the first element in its execution drug combination. Other states have used it before; Florida administers 500 milligrams of midazolam as part of its three-drug combination. Oklahoma used 100 milligrams of that drug.

“They should have anticipated possible problems with an untried execution protocol,” Autry said. “Obviously the whole thing was gummed up and botched from beginning to end. Halting the execution obviously did Lockett no good.”

Republican Gov. Mary Fallin ordered a 14-day stay of execution for an inmate who was scheduled to die two hours after Lockett, Charles Warner. She also ordered the state’s Department of Corrections to conduct a “full review of Oklahoma’s execution procedures to determine what happened and why during this evening’s execution.”

Robert Patton, the department’s director, halted Lockett’s execution about 20 minutes after the first drug was administered. He later said there had been vein failure.

The execution began at 6:23 p.m., when officials began administering the midazolam. A doctor declared Lockett to be unconscious at 6:33 p.m.

Once an inmate is declared unconscious, the state’s execution protocol calls for the second drug, a paralytic, to be administered. The third drug in the protocol is potassium chloride, which stops the heart. Patton said the second and third drugs were being administered when a problem was noticed. He said it’s unclear how much of the drugs made it into the inmate’s system.

Lockett began writhing at 6:36. At 6:39, a doctor lifted the sheet that was covering the inmate to examine the injection site.

“There was some concern at that time that the drugs were not having that (desired) effect, and the doctor observed the line at that time and determined the line had blown,” Patton said at a news conference afterward, referring to Lockett’s vein rupturing.

After an official lowered the blinds, Patton made a series of phone calls before calling a halt to the execution.

“After conferring with the warden, and unknown how much drugs went into him, it was my decision at that time to stop the execution,” Patton told reporters.

Lockett was declared dead at 7:06 p.m.

The American Civil Liberties Union of Oklahoma, which was not a party in the legal challenge to the state’s execution law, called for an immediate moratorium on state executions.

Warner had been scheduled to be executed two hours later in the same room and on the same gurney. The 46-year-old was convicted of raping and killing his roommate’s 11-month-old daughter in 1997. He has maintained his innocence.

By then, Fallin had issued a stay of her own — a one-week delay in Lockett’s execution that resulted in both men being scheduled to die on the same day.

Both men had sued to know more about the exection drugs and their suit was denied by the Oklahoma Supreme Court earlier this month.

 

Shocking Number Of Innocent People Sentenced To Death, Study Finds

More than 4 percent of inmates sentenced to death in the United States are probably innocent, according to a study published Monday that sent shock waves across the anti-death penalty community.

What the researchers call a “conservative estimate” about the number of wrongfully convicted death row inmates is more than double the percentage of capital defendants who were exonerated during more than three decades that were studied. That means innocent people are languishing behind bars, according to the study.

Read the rest here.

How could Oklahoma think that 100 mg of midazolam would be enough to generate a humane death when Florida is using 500 mg????? This dose Has never been tested on a human being!!!! It is monsterous to make inmates test subjects for executions! MONSTEROUS! INHUMANE!!! It turned out to be torture of the most hideous kind for Mr. Clayton. How is the death penalty allowed to continue under these circumstances?

Secondly, a study shows that greater than 4% of innocent people are sentenced to death. This begs the question of how many innocent people have been executed. I know for sure of at least one: Cameron Todd Willingham. This proves that execution cannot be meted out fairly and thus should not be used at all.

EXECUTE JUSTICE: NOT PEOPLE

If you would like to get even angrier, read this.

Here is what Rachel Maddow had to say about this last night:

 

Mississippi may execute an innocent woman this week.

March 24, 2014 Posted by suefairview

Michelle_Byrom_courtesy_MDOC_t670Here we go again:

From the Jackson Free Press:

“I sit in my room for a good 1 1/2-2 hours, and dad comes in my room, and goes off on me, calling me bastard, nogood, mistake, and telling me I’m inconciderate [sic] and just care about my self, and he slaps me, then goes back to his room.

“As I sat on my bed, tears of rage flowing, remembering my childhood my anger kept building and building, and I went to my car, got the 9mm, and walked to his room, peeked in, and he was asleep. I walked about 2 steps in the door, and screamed, and shut my eyes, when I heard him move, I started firing. When I opened my eyes again, I freaked! I grabbed what casings I saw, and threw them into the bushes, grabbed the gun, and went to town.”

Edward Byrom Jr. confessed to murdering his father, Edward Byrom Sr., on June 4, 1999, in a letter to his mother, excerpted above. One of at least four known confessions—there are two additional letters and a statement to his court-appointed psychologist—it might have been evidence to convict “Junior” for murder.

Instead, Tishomingo County deputies arrested Junior as part of a murder-for-hire conspiracy. Junior’s friend Joey Gillis was the shooter, they said, and his mother, Michelle Byrom, was the mastermind.

Junior led police to the murder weapon, though. And only Junior had gunpowder residue on his hands.

He made a deal. Junior testified against his mother in return for a reduced sentence.

The prosecutor’s theory, based on Junior’s statements (which police subsequently lost) was that Michelle planned to pay Gillis $15,000 for the hit from the proceeds of Edward Sr.’s life insurance.

Read the rest of the article here.

This poor woman. Michele was abused by her father and ran away from home at age 15, right into the arms of her abusive husband. Three years later, she gave birth to Junior. Continuing what her stepfather began, Edward Sr. verbally and physically abused Michelle. He forced her to have sex with other men, which he videotaped. Michelle now suffers from borderline personality disorder, depression, alcoholism and Muenchausen syndrome, a serious mental illness that caused her to ingest rat poison to make herself ill; as well as lupus, anemia, chronic pain from a dog attack and numerous surgeries, fibromyalgia and severe hypertension. She was on at least nine medications to treat her ailments. She had double pneumonia and was in the hospital at the time of the murder. She has been through numerous appeals, but the confessions and letters from her son admitting that he committed the crime have not be sumitted to the court first, because her attorneys’ were trying their first capital case and made a misjudgement, thinking they could bring up the evidence on appeal. But this appeal was denied. Unfortunately, on the stand, her son Junior denied everything.

So, the execution is set for March 27th. If she is executed, this will really be a stain on Governor Phil Bryant‘s record and a serious mark against the death penalty, as this is an innocent person who is going to be executed. And seemingly, nobody cares!