Category: ‘Safe Sex’

CAL/OSHA Hearing on May 21 on Proposed New Rules for Porn Shoots

May 18, 2015 Posted by suefairview

SUMMARY:

New regulations have been proposed by CAL/OSHA and a public hearing will be held on May 21 at 10:00 AM in Room 310 of the County Administration Center, 1600 Pacific Highway, San Diego CA.

This legislation is much more detailed than the prior proposed regulations 5193.1 from the AHF. Some of the good ideas include a consortium of trainers that porn companies can hire from, standardization of training and testing for employees across companies to avoid duplication, greater involvement of employees in the planning, more detail on STI’s that are included, minimum medical payment standards specified for all companies, justification for this rule plus cost/benefit analysis. This plan contains much more information and therefore will be easier to follow.

I really think that this kind of legislation is needed right now in the porn industry. It only makes sense.

Written comments can be sent to: Sarah Money, Occupational Safety and Health Standards Board, 2520 Venture Oaks Way, Suite 350, Sacramento, CA 95833. They also can be sent by fax at (916) 274-5743 and email to oshsb@dir.ca.gov

 

From XBIZ:

SAN DIEGO — Cal/OSHA’s standards board plans to hold a public hearing in San Diego next month over a proposal to amend California’s bloodborne pathogens statutes for condom use in adult film production.

At the public hearing to be held May 21, any person may present statements or arguments orally or in writing relevant to the proposed action that would significantly alter California Code of Regulations Title 8 § 5193, and mandate barrier protection, including condoms, to shield performers from contact with bloodborne pathogens, or other potentially infectious material during the production of films.

The AIDS Healthcare Foundation first proposed § 5193.1 in a December 2009 petition to the agency.

The board will hold a public hearing starting at 10 a.m. on May 21 in Room 310 of the County Administration Center, 1600 Pacific Highway, San Diego, Calif.

The written comment period commences on April 3 and closes at 5 p.m. on May 21. Comments can be sent by mail to: Sarah Money, Occupational Safety and Health Standards Board, 2520 Venture Oaks Way, Suite 350, Sacramento, CA 95833. They also can be sent by fax at (916) 274-5743 and email to oshsb@dir.ca.gov.

Below is information supplied by Cal/OSHA relative to the proposed § 5193.1

“Labor Code Section 142.3 establishes the Board as the only agency in the State authorized to adopt occupational safety and health standards. In addition, Labor Code Section 142.3 requires the adoption of occupational and health standards that are at least as effective as federal occupational safety

Pursuant to California Labor Code Section 142.3, the Occupational Safety and Health Standards Board (Board) may adopt, amend, or repeal occupational safety and health standards or orders. Section 142.3 permits the Board to prescribe, where appropriate, suitable protective equipment and control or technological procedures to be used in connection with occupational hazards and provide for monitoring or measuring employee exposure for their protection. In December 2009, Michael Weinstein, on behalf of the AIDS Healthcare Foundation (AHF), filed Petition No. 513, requesting the Board to amend Section 5193 to specifically address hazards in the adult film industry. On March 18, 2010, the Board adopted a petition decision which requested the Division to convene an advisory committee to consider possible regulatory changes and to prepare language if appropriate. From March 2010 through June 2011, the Division held six advisory committee meetings to gather information regarding how employers can better protect employees that are exposed to sexually transmitted diseases, and to assess whether adopting new regulatory language would more specifically address those hazards. There was strong participation by employees and employers, as well as medical and public health professionals, researchers, academics, and advocacy groups. Evidence was presented by public health agencies and others that employees who engage in sexual activities in the course of their work are at significant increased risk of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) including the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), gonorrhea and Chlamydia. Participants also complained that the language of the Bloodborne Pathogen regulation (8 CCR 5193) was not specific to their work exposures. Medical experts agreed that occupational exposure to STIs, including bloodborne and non-bloodborne pathogens, should be prevented by feasible controls mandated in a regulation. Since Section 5193 addresses only bloodborne diseases, the Board is proposing a separate Section 5193.1 to address this type of occupational exposure that includes bloodborne pathogens and other STIs. The proposed regulation would apply wherever employees, as part of their authorized work activity, engage in sexual activity with one or more other persons. Its application is not based upon the content or the intended audience of any media production, and, like the current standard, does not address any published content. The proposed regulation also provides for medical confidentiality and contains means to protect the identity of persons who take an HIV test, in order to be consistent with the requirements of the Health and Safety Code. This proposed rulemaking action is not inconsistent or incompatible with existing state regulations. This proposal is part of a system of occupational safety and health regulations. The consistency and compatibility of that system’s component regulations is provided by such things as: (1) the requirement of the federal government and the Labor Code to the effect that the State regulations be at least as effective as their federal counterparts, and (2) the requirement that all state occupational safety and health rulemaking be channeled through a single entity (the Standards Board). This proposed rulemaking action differs from existing federal regulations, in that federal OSHA does not have a specific counterpart standard for protecting employees against occupational exposure to sexually transmitted infections.

New Section 5193.1 Sexually Transmitted Infections

Subsection (a) Scope and Application. Proposed subsection (a) establishes that all workplaces, in which employees have occupational exposure to bloodborne pathogens and/or sexually transmitted pathogens due to one or more employees engaging in sexual activity with another individual, are required to comply with the provisions of this section. This includes activities that occur during the production of any film, video, multi-media or other recorded or live representation. Currently, employees who engage in sexual activity are protected by Section 5193, Bloodborne Pathogens, which requires a written program, certain engineering controls, personal protective equipment, medical services, training and record-keeping. However, Section 5193 does not specify control measures to be used in this industry and also does not address non-bloodborne sexually transmitted pathogens. This section will apply to employers whose employees engage in sexual activity with another individual, including employees in entertainment. Employees are exposed to chronic and lifethreatening illnesses when they engage in unprotected sexual activities. This places them at risk for acquiring infections with bloodborne pathogens including, but not limited to, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B (HBV) and hepatitis C (HCV) infection. It also places them at risk for acquiring infections, including repeated infections, with other sexually transmitted pathogens such as human papillomavirus (HPV), Chlamydia trachomatis (CT), and Neisseria gonorrhoeae (GC), hepatitis A virus (HAV), trichomonas vaginalis, and genital herpes simplex virus (HSV). The presence of these infections may also increase the risk of acquisition of bloodborne pathogens. The risk of infection is further increased due to work practices such as multiple and concurrent sex partners over short periods with whom they engage in frequent and often prolonged sex acts, and by the infrequent use of barrier methods to prevent exposure to infectious body fluids. A number of HIV infections have been associated with this work activity. In a 2007 article, Taylor stated that in 2004 the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) documented transmission of HIV infection from one performer to three other performers, despite industry testing protocols. 1 A high incidence of infection with non-bloodborne sexually transmitted pathogens has also been recorded among performers engaged in sexual activity while working in the production of “adult” entertainment. A study based on cases reported to the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health (LACDPH) found that between midyear 2004 and 2008, 2,848 sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) were diagnosed among 1,868 performers who tested at Adult Industry Medical (AIM). Chlamydia was the most frequent diagnosis (57.5% of performers), followed by gonorrhea (34.7%) and co-infection with both STDs (7.8%). The same study documented that CT and GC infections are recurrent among performers and that the reinfection rate within one year was 26.1%. Female performers were 27% more likely to be reinfected than male performers. 2 Approximately 70% of STIs occurred in female performers. Several cases of syphilis were also reported. The Los Angeles County Department of Public Health believes that these disease rates are significant underestimates of the true disease rates because oral and rectal anatomic sites are not routinely screened, are often asymptomatic, and are likely to serve as disease reservoirs for repeated infections. 3 HBV and HPV are recognized carcinogens.

Subsection (a)(1) establishes the scope of workplaces to be covered by the standard. The proposal identifies those workplaces which will be required to implement protective measures to reduce the incidence and control the transmission of sexually transmitted infections.

Subsection (a)(2)(A) establishes that all workers, including but not limited to performers, employees who are present when sexual activity occurs, or who are responsible for cleaning or decontaminating the work area, equipment or laundry, are covered by the requirements of the proposed section. The proposal identifies those affected employees who are at risk of contracting sexually transmitted infections.

Subsection (a)(2)(B) states that compliance with this section constitutes compliance with Section 5193 for the workplaces in which it applies. The effect is to ensure that workplaces in which employees engage in sexual activity follow the appropriate precautions to protect employees against sexually transmitted diseases. This subsection also specifies that where workplaces use sharps, other than personal care sharps, the employer must also comply with the relevant provisions of Section 5193. The effect is to ensure safe procedures for handling and disposal of sharps where they are used, and to continue to provide equivalent safety to the federal bloodborne pathogen standard, 29 CFR 1910.1030.

Subsection (a)(3) establishes that the employer shall provide all safeguards required by this section, including barriers, personal protective equipment, training, and medical services, at no cost to the employee, at a reasonable time and place for the employee, and during the employee’s working hours. This is intended to provide notice to the regulated public of an existing requirement of Labor Code Section 6311, as interpreted by the courts. 4 The proposal will ensure that employees are not deterred by cost or logistical barriers from participating in the medical surveillance and training programs, and are provided with all necessary safeguards.

Subsection (b) Definitions

The standard proposes a number of definitions that are intended to explain the terminology and concepts that have been incorporated into the text. Some of the terms have been defined to be consistent with existing definitions in other titles of the California Code of Regulations, and are intended to be interpreted consistently with their use in those sections. The proposed definitions will clarify to the employer and employees the meanings for the terms used within the context of the requirements of Section 5193.1 and help ensure compliance with this standard, and protect employees from STIs.

Subsection (c) Exposure Prevention and Response

Subsection (c)(1)(A) requires that employers establish, implement, and maintain an effective Exposure Control Plan (Plan), designed to eliminate or minimize employee exposure and which is consistent with Section 3203. The proposal will ensure that employers establish, implement, and maintain a Plan; and that employers and employees follow all required control measures.

Subsection (c)(1)(B)(1-7) establishes that the Plan shall be in writing and identifies the basic elements that an employer would be responsible for incorporating into the exposure control plan. The effect of this subsection is to establish how the employer will provide the required control measures.

Subsection (c)(1)(C) requires each employer to ensure that a copy of the Plan is available at the worksite at all times that employees are present. The effect of this subsection is to enable covered employees to refer to procedures that should be followed to protect them against sexually transmitted infections.

Subsection (c)(1)(D) establishes that the Plan shall be reviewed and updated at least annually and whenever necessary, and that employees be involved in the plan review. The Division has found that periodic review of exposure control plans with the involvement of affected employees provides an important mechanism to improve the employer’s health and safety program and protect workers. The effect of this provision is to require that the employer have effective procedures for reviewing the Plan and for ensuring employee participation in that review.

Subsection (c)(1)(E) requires each employer to review the Plan after each exposure incident to determine the cause of the incident and to determine whether any change in control measure is necessary. The effect of this subsection is to ensure that exposure incidents are effectively investigated and that any changes necessary to prevent future incidents are implemented in the Plan.

Subsection (c)(1)(F) requires that the employer make the Plan available to affected employees and their representatives, to the Chief of the Division of Occupational Safety and Health (Division) and to National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (NIOSH). The intent is to provide the Plan to employees and their representatives to ensure that they can play their appropriate roles in Plan implementation, and discover any problems in the Plan. The effect is also to provide access to the Chief in order that the Division may effectively enforce this standard. It is necessary to provide access to NIOSH so that NIOSH may effectively perform its statutory role in evaluating health and safety hazards and the methods of control.

Proposed subsection (d) Methods of Compliance

Subsection (d)(1) is intended to establish that universal precautions shall be observed to prevent contact with blood or other potentially infectious materials – sexually transmitted infections (OPIM—STI). Universal precautions is an approach to infection control which treats all human blood and certain bodily fluids as infectious, regardless of the source individual. This subsection also clarifies that under circumstances in which differentiation between bodily fluid types is difficult or impossible, all bodily fluids will be considered potentially infectious materials. This effect is to ensure that control measures are taken to protect employees against sexually transmitted infections.

Subsection (d)(2) requires that each employer maintain engineering and work practice controls sufficient to protect employees from exposure to blood and/or OPIM-STI. When simulation of sexual activity using acting, production, and postproduction techniques are not used, or do not prevent all occupational exposure, additional control measures will be required. The effect is to establish that this section requires the use of engineering and work practice controls that physically prevent infectious materials from contacting another person and to identify acceptable protective barriers and the procedures that must be followed during use, to ensure that condoms and other barriers are used effectively and that the protection that they provide is not compromised through improper use.

Subsection (d)(3) provides a list of additional prohibited practices so that that employers and employees understand which practices must be avoided to prevent disease transmission. This list is intended to reduce the risk of sexually transmitted diseases and is needed to identify which control measures should be used.

Subsection (d)(4) establishes a list of specific control measures that address contaminated items, cleaning, and decontamination. This list includes the following: (A) requirements to handle contaminated sharps; (B) requirements to handle contaminated waste; (C) requirements to address the cleaning and decontamination of the worksite; (D) requirements to provide hygiene facilities; (E) requirements applicable to the handling of contaminated laundry; and (F) requirements to address personal protective equipment (PPE). The effect is to assure that employers administer work practice controls that reduce the likelihood that individuals will be exposed to infectious materials by physically reducing the amount of infectious materials on that person, and by reducing the contact time with infectious materials that may be on the skin or mucous membranes.

Proposed subsection (e) Medical Services and Post-Exposure Follow-Up

The purpose of proposed subsection (e) is to establish the appropriate medical services, postexposure evaluation and follow-up that must be provided to employees who have occupational exposure. The effect is to reduce the likelihood that employees will acquire infection and develop disease by providing access to medical services, appropriate vaccination, and postexposure evaluation and follow-up.

Subsection (e)(1) establishes general requirements to ensure access to medical services. The effect of this subsection is to ensure that employees are provided with appropriate medical services to prevent infection and that occupational injuries and illnesses are appropriately recorded and treated. The effect is also to ensure that employees do not refuse medical evaluation due to cost, confidentiality, or other concerns. The intent of this subsection is to protect employees against sexually transmitted infections, to prevent further transmission, and ensure that the Division and local health departments are able to control infectious disease hazards at places of employment covered by the standard.

Subsection (e)(2) establishes requirements for vaccinations. The effect of this subsection is to ensure that vaccines are provided in a timely manner at no cost to the employee, and to allow an employee to reconsider a decision to decline a vaccination. This is intended to assure that the number of employees who ultimately become vaccinated is maximized in order to reduce the risk of acquiring or transmitting vaccine preventable diseases.

Subsection (e)(3) establishes requirements for periodic medical services and outlines the documentation that employer shall obtain regarding the provision of these services. This proposal will ensure that employees with occupational exposure be provided confidential medical services at no cost, in accordance with Appendix C and D, to limit the spread of disease.

Subsection (e)(4) establishes requirements for post-exposure evaluation and follow-up. The intent of this subsection is to establish that following a report of an exposure incident, the employer must make immediately available to the exposed employee a confidential medical evaluation and follow-up. The effect of this subsection is to protect employees against life threatening sexually transmitted infections and to prevent further transmission. The effect of this subsection is also to ensure that employees receive medical evaluations after an incident and that necessary information is provided to the health care provider to assist that professional in the evaluation of the employee’s medical status. The intent of this subsection is to protect employees against sexually transmitted infections and limit the spread of disease. This is also necessary to permit the Division and public health agencies to investigate occupational infections and take preventive action.

Subsection (e)(5) establishes requirements for information that must be provided to the Physician or other Licensed Health Care Professional (PLHCP). The effect is to ensure that the health care provider be given the information necessary to assist that professional in the evaluation of the employee’s medical status and for consistency with Section 5193.

Subsection (e)(6) establishes requirements for the written opinion of the PLHCP. The intent of this subsection is to establish that the employer shall obtain and provide the employee with a copy of the evaluating healthcare professional’s written opinion within 15 days of the completed evaluation. The effect of this subsection is to ensure that information necessary to the employer’s program be transmitted in a timely manner, without compromising the employee medical privacy and confidentiality provisions, and for consistency with Section 5193 Bloodborne Pathogens.

Subsection (e)(7) establishes requirements regarding medical recordkeeping. The intent of this subsection is to establish that the employer shall maintain medical records in accordance with subsection (g)(1). This effect of this subsection is to ensure that employers create records which can be used to track employee medical information and which can help the Division effectively enforce this section.

Proposed subsection (f) Communication of Hazards to Employees

The purpose of proposed subsection (f) is to establish the requirements for training and communicating hazards to employees. The effect of this subsection is to ensure that employees are provided with training as necessary to correctly utilize control measures and protect themselves and others from sexually transmitted infections. This is necessary because appropriate employee actions are critical to protecting their own health and preventing further transmission.

Subsection (f)(1) addresses requirements regarding labels and signs and references Section 5193(g)(1). The intent is to assure employees are effectively notified about the hazard through signage and labeling. The effect is to ensure that contaminated sharps are appropriately handled on-site, and by downstream handlers.

Subsection (f)(2) addresses requirements regarding information and training. The intent of this subsection is to ensure that employees are provided with training as necessary to correctly utilize control measures and protect themselves and others from sexually transmitted infections.

Subsection (f)(2)(A) requires that employers ensure that all employees with occupational exposure participate in a training program which must be provided at no cost to the employee and during working hours. The effect is to ensure that employees are provided with training, as necessary and at no cost to the employee, to correctly utilize control measures and protect themselves and others from sexually transmitted infections.

Subsection (f)(2)(B) provides the timeframe for required training. The effect is to ensure that employees have an adequate understanding of new exposure control measures implemented by the employer and are made aware of changes in exposure scenarios that may require additional control measures. This is intended to assure that employees can protect themselves and others from sexually transmitted infections.

Subsection (f)(2)(C) requires that annual training be provided to all employees within 12 months of the previous training. The effect is to ensure that employees are trained at least once every 12 months.

Subsection (f)(2)(D) requires that the person conducting the training be knowledgeable in the subject matter covered by the elements contained in the training program as it relates to the workplace. The intent is to ensure that the trainer can provide information that is accurate and relevant to the site, facility, and operational procedures of the employer.

Subsection (f)(2)(E) requires that the employer conduct a safety meeting prior to any employee engaging in sexual activity. This subsection also establishes that the employer provide information to all individuals who participate in the activity or the production regarding the control measures to be used, and specific information regarding the employer’s procedures for emergencies, exposure incidents, and post-exposure evaluation and follow-up. The effect is to require employers to inform employees of the specific safety measures to be used for the activities.

Subsection (f)(2)(F) requires that appropriate training materials be used. Appropriate content and vocabulary to educational level, literacy, and language of employees is needed to ensure that employees are provided with a basic understanding of the disease process and the mechanisms of transmission of STIs, which will improve their ability to recognize the diseases. The effect is to ensure that employees have sufficient knowledge to implement control measures to protect themselves against disease.

Subsection (f)(2)(G) specifies the minimum content of the training. The purpose and effect of this subsection is to ensure that employees are provided with training as necessary to correctly utilize control measures and to protect themselves and others from sexually transmitted infections.

Subsection (f)(2)(H) requires that employees be given an opportunity for interactive questions and answers with the person conducting the training session. The effect is to ensure that the employees can have questions answered by a person who is knowledgeable about the work activities and the employer’s exposure control plan, and that they be provided this opportunity during the training, so that the employee can get answers to their questions as they come up and in the context of other information being provided.

Subsection (f)(2)(I) establishes that, due to the intermittent nature of employment in this industry, one or more employers may arrange to conduct training as a consortium, so long as each employer ensures that the training provided meets the requirements stated in subsection (f)(2)(G). The effect of this subsection is to provide a means by which employers can maximize training resources by consolidating general training, while still ensuring that employees are provided with the necessary training to protect themselves and others from sexually transmitted infections. Proposed subsection (g) Recordkeeping.

Subsection (g) establishes the requirements for creating and maintaining the records that have been identified within this proposed standard. The effect is to ensure that employers create records which can be used to assess the effectiveness of the program and to track employee medical information. These records are also necessary for the Division to be able to effectively enforce this section.

Subsection (g)(1) establishes requirements for medical records. This is intended to ensure consistency with Sections 5193 and 3204, and with medical privacy provisions of California and federal law.

Subsection (g)(2) establishes requirements for training records. The effect is to clearly inform the employer of the required content of the record of training and the required time to maintain the record for each employee.

Subsection (g)(3) establishes requirements for maintaining records of the implementation of the exposure control plan. This effect is to ensure that the employer will be able to evaluate the effectiveness of its program and to demonstrate whether the control measures are working. These records are also necessary for the Division to be able to effectively enforce the provisions of this section.

Subsection (g)(4) establishes requirements for maintaining records regarding the production, sale or purchase of materials in which employees engaged in sexual activity. This subsection requires that the employer create and maintain a log for each segment of footage or other representation produced or purchased, and the required information for the log. The effect is to ensure that records are created and maintained that will permit the Division to effectively enforce the provisions of this section.

Subsection (g)(5) establishes requirements for the availability of employee medical and training records. The effect is to ensure that records will be made available to employees, employers, the Division, and public health agencies, as appropriate and consistent with other regulations and laws.

Subsection (g)(6) establishes requirements for the transfer of records. The effect of this subsection is to provide a means of notification of employees of the employer’s intent to dispose of employee exposure and medical records consistent with Section 3204, require transfer of employee exposure and medical records to a successor employer, consistent with Section 3204, and provide a means by which NIOSH or the Division can request records from an employer who notifies them that the employer is ceasing to do business, and there is no successor employer.

Subsection (h) establishes that the appendices to this section are mandatory. This includes Appendices A1, A2, and A3, which contain vaccine declination statements, Appendix B, which contains specific work practice requirements for use of barrier protection, Appendix C, which contains minimum requirements for medical services, and Appendix D, which contains a declination statement for an employee who chooses not to participate in medical services. These appendices are necessary elaborations on requirements referenced in the body of the standard.

Appendix A1 – Hepatitis B Vaccine Declination (Mandatory)

This proposed appendix is intended to provide the appropriate language to be used in the statement that will be signed when an employee declines to accept a HBV vaccination. This declination provides specific language that ensures that the employee is aware of the nature of the vaccine, the fact that it is being provided free of charge, and the right to receive the vaccination at a later date. This declination is also intended to provide a record confirming that the vaccine was appropriately offered. The effect is to ensure that employees are aware of the risk they take by refusing an offered vaccine, and that they have a right to request the vaccine later if they continue to have occupational exposure.

Appendix A2 – Human Papilloma Virus Vaccine Declination (Mandatory)

Appendix A2 – Human Papilloma Virus Vaccine Declination (Mandatory)

This proposed appendix is intended to provide the appropriate language to be used in the statements that will be signed when an employee declines to accept HPV vaccination. This declination provides specific language that ensures that the employee is aware of the nature of the vaccine, the fact that it is being provided free of charge, and the right to receive the vaccination at a later date. This declination is also intended to provide a record confirming that the vaccine was appropriately offered. The effect is to ensure that employees are aware of the risk they take by refusing an offered vaccine, and that they have a right to request the vaccine later if they continue to have occupational exposure.

Appendix A3 – Hepatitis A Vaccine Declination (Mandatory)

This proposed appendix is intended to provide the appropriate language to be used in the statements that will be signed when an employee declines to accept HAV vaccination. This declination provides specific language that ensures that the employee is aware of the nature of the vaccine, the fact that it is being provided free of charge, and the right to receive the vaccination at a later date. This declination is also intended to provide a record confirming that the vaccine was appropriately offered. The effect is to ensure that employees are aware of the risk they take by refusing an offered vaccine, and that they have a right to request the vaccine later if they continue to have occupational exposure.

Appendix B – Use of Protective Barriers (Mandatory)

This proposed appendix is intended to identify acceptable protective barriers and the procedures that must be followed during use to comply with this section. The effect is to ensure that condoms and other barriers are used effectively, to maximize the protection they provide, and to ensure that they do not become a source of exposure.

Appendix C – Minimum Requirements for Medical Services (Mandatory)

This proposed appendix is intended to identify medical services and the specific testing that must be offered to an employee to detect infections, in order to provide effective treatment and prevent the spread of the disease

Appendix D – Declination of Periodic or Post-Exposure Medical Services (Mandatory) This proposed appendix is intended to provide the appropriate language to be used in the statements that will be signed when an employee declines to accept periodic or post-exposure medical services, services which play a critical role in preventing the spread of the disease. This proposal will protect the employee’s health, ensure that employees are aware of the risks they take by refusing these services and prevent further transmission. It also provides a means for the Division to determine whether the services were offered as required without compromising the employee’s medical privacy.

Anticipated Benefits

The proposal will render California general industry bloodborne pathogens and sexually transmitted infection standards clearer and easier to understand by both employers and the Division who have the responsibility to enforce the standard. It will also enhance the safety and health of employees with the implementation of engineering and work practice controls, an exposure control plan, hepatitis B, hepatitis A and human papillomavirus vaccinations, medical services, and information and training on health and safety without compromising or reducing the effectiveness of Section 5193 or the current Bloodborne Pathogens federal standard. This proposal would also provide for appropriate medical services for affected employees and will provide for medical confidentiality and protect the identity of persons who take an HIV test in order to be consistent with the requirements of the Health and Safety Code.

Cost Impacts on a Representative Private Person Or Business

Currently, employers covered by this standard are required to comply with Section 5193, which includes requirements for a written program, the use of engineering and work-practice controls, prevention of all contact with the mouth, eyes, skin, and mucous membranes with blood, semen, or vaginal secretions, use of personal protective equipment, medical services including postexposure evaluation and follow-up, training, and record-keeping. By limiting requirements to those relevant to sexual transmission, this proposal may reduce costs to covered employers. There may be additional costs related to provision of HAV and HPV vaccine; however, those costs will be offset by lowering the costs to employers of occupationally acquired infections. In addition, this standard provides savings by permitting the use of consortium PLHCPs and trainers.

Statewide Adverse Economic Impact Directly Affecting Businesses and Individuals

The Board has made an initial determination that this proposal should not result in a significant, statewide adverse economic impact directly affecting businesses, including the ability of California businesses to compete with businesses in other states. Two factors provide the basis for the Board’s determination: (1) this new standard, while more tailored to a specific industry, is based on a pre-existing national bloodborne pathogen standard that is already enforced in California; and (2) the regulated community has a unique legal status nationally, resulting in no states suitable to the relocation of the industry. All states are covered by either 29 CFR 1910.1030 or an equivalent state standard, that would require the use of condoms or other engineering controls by employees who engage in sexual activity in the course of employment. Employers are also required to offer hepatitis B vaccine, and post-exposure follow-up, training, and other protection in all states.

Additional Vaccinations and Medical Services

The only additional costs associated with this standard involve vaccination for HPV and HAV. Under the existing Bloodborne Pathogens standard, employers are already required to provide HBV vaccinations to all employees with occupational exposure to HBV. Section 5193.1 would expand coverage to include vaccination for HPV and HAV. According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, the private sector costs per dose for each vaccine are as follows:

• HAV: $63.10, requiring two doses for a complete series.

• HPV4: $141.38, requiring three doses for a complete series.

Therefore, in order to vaccinate one employee with a complete series for HAV and HPV4 would cost approximately $550.34. Providing annual STD screening tests for employees should average less than $800 per business. These costs are a small percentage of gross income per business that averages over $100 million per year. In addition, this standard provides cost reduction measures to covered employers, which should lower the projected vaccination costs for employers. First, Section 5193.1 allows employers to use a consortium PLHCP in order to share costs among employers. Second, some employees will either decline the vaccination or have already received the complete series. Finally, due to the intermittent nature of employment in the industry, it is anticipated that the majority of employers will only employ an individual for the duration of one shot in the series for each vaccination. These savings will offset any potential additional costs of HPV or HAV vaccine. Finally, since employers in all states are required to bear the costs of occupational infections, generally through a workers compensation system, reducing the incidence of infection will achieve additional savings.

Training and Written Procedures: Current regulations require employers to provide training and have written procedures covering bloodborne pathogens such as HIV, Hepatitis B and C. Additionally, the IIPP requires that employers implement an effective injury and illness prevention program which must include a written program, communication and training. This standard provides cost reduction measures to covered employers by permitting the use of consortium PLHCPs to train their employees. Thus, any costs regarding the additional coverage of STIs should be insignificant.

DETERMINATION OF MANDATE

The Occupational Safety and Health Standards Board has determined that the proposed standard does not impose a local mandate. There are no costs to any local government or school district which must be reimbursed in accordance with Government Code Sections 17500 through 17630.
SMALL BUSINESS DETERMINATION

The Board has determined that the proposed amendment does not affect small businesses because Government Code section 11342.610 excludes entertainment businesses from the definition of small business.
RESULTS OF THE ECONOMIC IMPACT ASSESSMENT/ANALYSIS

The proposed regulation will not have any effect on the creation or elimination of California jobs or the creation or elimination of California businesses or affect the expansion of existing California businesses.

BENEFITS OF THE PROPOSED ACTION

The proposal will render California general industry bloodborne pathogens and sexually transmitted infection standards clearer and easier to understand by both employers and the Division who have the responsibility to enforce the standard. It will also enhance the safety and health of employees with the implementation of engineering and work practice controls, an exposure control plan, hepatitis B, hepatitis A and human papillomavirus vaccinations, medical services, and information and training on health and safety without compromising or reducing the effectiveness of Section 5193 or the current Bloodborne Pathogens federal standard. This proposal would also provide for appropriate medical services for affected employees and will provide for medical confidentiality and protect the identity of persons who take an HIV test in order to be consistent with the requirements of the Health and Safety Code.

CONSIDERATION OF ALTERNATIVES

In accordance with Government Code Section 11346.5(a)(13), the Board must determine that no reasonable alternative it considered to the regulation or that has otherwise been identified and brought to its attention would either be more effective in carrying out the purpose for which the action is proposed, or would be as effective and less burdensome to affected private persons than the proposed action, or would be more cost-effective to affected private persons and equally effective in implementing the statutory policy or other provision of law. The Board invites interested persons to present statements or arguments with respect to alternatives to the proposed regulation at the scheduled public hearing or during the written comment period.”
 

 

Las Vegas AIDS case makes condoms-in-porn initiative likely to pass in California

January 26, 2015 Posted by suefairview

Nevada considers tighter rules after porn actor infected with HIV

January 12, 2015 Posted by suefairview

An adult movie shoot in Nevada that ended with two male actors infected with HIV has state and local health officials considering more stringent safety regulations for pornographic film productions, including mandatory use of condoms.

Health officials are looking at whether more specific and stringent rules are needed for the porn industry, which has grown in Nevada since 2012. That’s when Los Angeles County began requiring adult movie performers to wear condoms during filming, prompting a sharp decline in porn production in what long has been the industry’s capital city.

Read the rest of the story here.

2 male porn performers test positive for HIV

January 11, 2015 Posted by suefairview


LOS ANGELES (AP) — Two adult film actors have contracted HIV, with one most likely infecting the other during unprotected sex at a film shoot in Nevada where testing was less stringent than industry standards, officials said.

Read the full story here.

This story was actually reported last year, on Dec. 30, 2014, but it is so depressing, predictable, and preventable that I have held off on reporting it.

There is a huge market/demand for raw-sex that drives the industry into making unsafe choices. Many, many dollars are quite an incentive to go condomless. Over time, more companies are moving to unsafe sex to satisfy customers who get off on the risk. Some industry leaders have been known to think that the safe-sex market is going away and the future is condomless.

If you were an adult entertainer faced with the choice of making $400 – $600 per scene for safe sex OR making $1500 to $2000 per scene with travel and amenities plus medical care, what would you choose? If one has limited marketable skills and/or lives in a third-world country, the choice is obvious. In my opinion, this is very exploitative on the part of the companies.

Yes, it is true that some raw-sex companies are doing rigorous testing. But I wonder how much they pay attention to the results of the testing? I hear that they are not. Also, there are many smaller companies who are not complying with any testing.

Are raw-sex companies sero-sorting adult entertainers? I think that they are not, based on what I have heard, and this is proven by the news report above.

Furthermore, are any companies being very careful about issues relating to raw sex and potential new infection; I fear that they are not.

So, if you were a HIV- actor performing unsafe sex, how do you protect yourself? I would hope that you are taking Truvada [or a similar medication]; though this particular use is not approved by the FDA. But I see young men, many of whom I have met in person, in raw-sex roles and I worry for them. I really want to help, but I feel that I have failed them in this mission.

My blog was dedicated to promoting safe-sex and is a safe-sex only blog. Though unpopular, I supported legislation to insure safe sex practices. This legislation was tabled in California. As I have seen more and more companies and people having raw-sex I have become very depressed. This is why I have backed away from doing reviews. Please understand, that I have dedicated my life to fighting the spread of HIV [and to finding a cure in the past]. I am afraid I have lost this battle.

The cost will be extremely high. We will see more people getting infected on porn shoots in the future if no legislation is enacted.

But, I cannot fight what the public wants to see and what the public thinks is hot. I have no fight left in me; I am sorry.

Here is more information from Dirk Caber‘s blog:

My Interview with Loverboy Mag, RAW & UNEDITED

November 20, 2014 Posted by suefairview

I have posted this unedited interview because the one appearing in Loverboy Mag is edited to the extent where my views are lost. 
On Fri, Oct 24, 2014 at 3:06 PM, SueHuybensz <suehuybensz@comcast.net> wrote:

Here is my attempt to answer your questions. I will send links separately.

From: “Michael Turnbull” <michael@loverboymagazine.com>
To: “SueHuybensz” <suehuybensz@comcast.net>
Sent: Thursday, October 23, 2014 4:04:48 AM
Subject: Loverboy questions

Hi Sue,

You ok?
Sorry for the delay in this. You probably thought it was never coming!
Here are the questions. See what you think. Any issues let me know. Please don’t use my real name.

Also tell me what links or info you want underneath. xx

I am honored to be interviewed by Loverboy Magazine. I have always felt that I am not the story, the adult entertainers are the story. But I do get that who I am and what I do is rare, so here we go.
  • Do you want to be called Fairview Sue or Sue Huybensz?

    I prefer to be called Sue Fairview, since that is the url to my blog and people who need to know my real name know what it is.

  • Why ‘Fairview Sue’?

    When I thought of the name, I just knew it was perfect. I really try to be compassionate and fair.

  • Besides your current vocation, you previously worked at a pharmaceutical company trying to find a cure for HIV. Have you always worked in gay-related jobs?

    No, that was my first brush with the gay world, so to speak.

  • Can you tell me about your pharmaceutical job?

    I studied to be a chemist and was thrilled to get a job at big pharma. The company was so big, that I never had to leave to have many careers. I worked as an infectious diseases biochemist, an analytical chemist, a safety coordinator and radiation safety officer, a compliance assurance good clinical practices auditor, in the Oncology clinical research department and as one of two employees helping upper managment to streamline clinical procedures worldwide with regard to lessening the time it takes to study a drug and move it to approval. Whilst in Oncology, in addition to working on some very important, life-saving cancer drugs, I had the wonderful opportunity to work on the second antiretroviral drug to be approved in the USA and Canada in both adults and children. My work began in 1989 and AIDS was a very dire diagnoses back then. The company was the first ever to give drug away for free to almost 70,000 patients as part of an expanded access program. I led a small group of my peers in the monitoring of 100 participating sites and the data was used for the safety portion of the New Drug Application to the Food and Drug Administration. In doing so, I traveled across the country monitoring sites and got to see how AIDS stole the health and lives of young men. It was quite sobering. But I also met many very dedicated physicians and nurses.

    I had another opportunity to work on a chemotherapy for Kaposi’s Sarcoma. The drug was extremely effective and we had total cures with it. I was honored and proud to meet a brave patient who testified at the FDA hearing for that one.

  • Do you have a lot of gay friends? Have you always known a lot of LGBT people?

    I didn’t meet any that I knew of until I worked at big pharma. Of course, all of them were closeted at work, as our company was conservative. I had a very good lesbian friend who had to come out due to discrimination by her boss. I have always felt that LGBT people have a more mature perspective on life in general, since they know firsthand how bigoted and hurtful some people can be and have to shield themselves from that. They are well in touch with reality. To me, the personality of my LGBT friends shone out of them like a bright light.

  • I know there were concerns about running a porn blog, because your local village/town is not necessarily the most liberal place. Was it ok when you were working at the pharmaceutical company? Did they say anything then?

    I did not start the blog until I was disabled. But It would have been scandalous! LOL!

  • What happened when you had your brain aneurysm? Where were you? Did you collapse? How was it diagnosed? Did you need an operation?

    Well, the night before I had just gotten home from a several day seminar in NYC where I was training my peers. I took the train home and had a migraine and was exhausted. I stood in the doorway in my raincoat, with nothing left. The next day was a Friday and I was to be reviewed by my bitch boss, a cardiologist who wanted to “coach” me. Ugh! I felt trapped and that I could not face the morning. I went to bed.

    My husband was awakened by the phone ringing. It was my office saying that I had my review this morning and how come I wasn’t in yet? My husband looked into my room and I was unresponsive and grey. He quickly stated that he had a medical emergency and would get back to them. He then carried me down the stairs and took me to my doctor, who called an ambulance and I was rushed to the local medical center for a brain scan. That scan showed a large brain hemorrhage and I was taken by helicopter to Yale Medical Center. I was diagnosed with a “formidable” arterovenous malformation, a congenital condition. My neuro-vascular surgeon was world renowned in treating this condition – he saved my life. I required 2 brain surgeries, one to drain the clot and one to remove the AVM, and needed two procedures to prepare the AVM for removal. My outcome was truly a miracle. I am in the top 95th percentile of outcomes. I am very thankful for my recovery! More of the trials and tribulations of this experience are documented on my blog under the label “Health” in an 8 post series called “Brush with death”.

  • It obviously left you disabled afterwards. But did it change your work ethic and what you wanted to do with your career?

    My disability was not obvious to me at all, as it was invisible and I felt great. I read Lance Armstrong’s ITS NOT ABOUT THE BIKE for guidance. Your surgeon cures you and then what? I had a terrific outcome, so I went back to work after a 6 month sick leave because my job was so important and beneficial to society. It took 4 tortuous years for me to convince myself that I was disabled. Basically, I had less stamina than before, chronic daily migraines, epilepsy [I had 2 grand mal seizures at work], and far less mental acuity than before to the point that I was useless in my profession. My nearly eidetic memory and typically sharp mental acuity was gone and that, with my knowledge of chemistry drug regulation and medicine, was my value to big pharma. But my expectations for myself had not changed; I was still a type A person, so my work ethic did not change at all.

    But the entire episode gave me so much empathy for others; I had thought that because I worked on cancers and AIDS that I understood that life is short and what suffering is. I learned that it was egotistical of me to think this. It took nearly dying to wake me up to how beautiful a treasure life is, and how quickly it can end.

    Also, spiritually, it changed me. I had had dreams beforehand that I was the Dalai Lama and had great interest in Buddhism. My compassion for others skyrocketed through this experience.

    I was so driven to help people, that I thought about joining the fire department. I actually went on a training run with them and helped cut a roof off of a car. That was so exciting! But I didn’t think that working for the fire department would be good for my health as I needed to keep regular hours. I also tried to start a Gay/Straight Alliance in my local school district, but the person I spoke with said that there were none of that “type” of student in the classes. I tried to explain that the group would also be for straight people and the message would be tolerance so that bullying would be eliminated. But it was a no go. I also tried volunteering for True Colors, a safe-house/mentoring group. But they were based in Hartford, which was too far for me to drive. So, I volunteered at my town’s local library for 6 or so years.

  • When did you realise you enjoyed watching gay porn?

    I have always been a very sexual person and love looking at naked men! It didn’t really start for me until I noticed gay porn stars. Of course, then I wanted to see them in action. Who wouldn’t???? My first gay porn was when I became a reviewer for Stag Homme Studios. I loved their films; they were so freaking hot! Over the years, Stag Homme has developed into quite the creative artists and I feel that they are undervalued as a company. Next was Liberate Studios in South Africa, then LoganMcCree.tv, and finally Raging Stallion Studios. I have never bought commercial porn in my life. I got to be a reviewer for Raging Stallion by writing an email to Bruno Bond when Focus/Refocus was coming out. My email was titled “Ain’t too proud to beg” and I pointed out that I was a huge murder mystery fan and would love to review this movie. I heard back several weeks later that RSS had taken me on as a reviewer! Imagine, reviewing gay porn while watching it! I was in bliss!

  • Is it the lack of a women that you like watching or the idea of two men? Double your money! :)

    Well, I have no sexual interest in women, so why would want to watch porn that has them? The idea of two men is just so hot! I love to watch them kissing and hugging and you know… LOL!

  • Do you ever watch gay porn with your husband?

    Not really. I have shown him some, and he just isn’t into it.

  • How extreme do you like your BDSM? You were saying before you didn’t like clamps, fisting, or watersports. That sounds like you are into more straight female BDSM where it is more erotic than hardcore male sexual fetish. Is that fair?

    Not really. I love the aspect of being tied down. When I was at International Mr. Leather in 2012, I got locked into a kennel. It made me high! I also love floggers. My favorite BDSM movie was RSS Fetish Force’s film Back Alley and my favorite scene was with Leo Forte and Jessie Santana. The review is on the blog. I asked Leo why the movie wasn’t nominated for awards, and he told me that it was too hardcore for the general fans to appreciate. I also don’t mind watching sounding. I don’t like clamps on balls; it looks so painful! But I don’t mind them on other parts of the body.

  • What kind of men are you attracted to? (It’s bears and muscle isn’t it?)

    I adore hairy bodybuilders and a beard just makes it all the more delectable. So, yes please!

  • In which case do you understand the attraction with twinks?

    Absolutely. I have reviewed a couple of twink films and one can forget that they are not bodybuilders and see that they can really know what they are doing. Plus some of them are so beautiful!

  • What made you want to set up your own blog?

    So, there I was, bored and disabled. But I saw a show on tv called America’s Top Male Model. There was a scandal that one of the contestants did some stripping in a gay bar. I researched that online and discovered blogs! I began going to gay blogs everywhere to see the cheesecake as well as porn clips, but really became friends with Brenton Parry of Aussielicious. He is the one that inspired me to start a blog. At first I was just posting excerpts from a book I was writing and then just tidbits of news about myself on my blog. But I quickly noticed that if one posted photos of nude men, one got more traffic. Then later on, I discovered that if one posted photos of cocks, traffic would soar! The most traffic I ever got was 4,000 hits per day. This was severely curtailed when WordPress shut me down for having a gay porn blog. I never have recovered all of those hits plus I lost many photos; some of which I have never recovered. Now I own my domain personally.

  • Tell me about Fairview Fantasies?

    Everyone has sexual fantasies, am I right? Well I had this great idea that two scientists could have fun adventures worldwide. The protagonist was a lepidopterist named Mr. Butterfly; he had a PhD, but why stand on ceremony? His counterpart was Dr. Sue Fairview, a botanist who specialized in orchids. Then I thought that my total fantasy was to cure AIDS, so why not incorporate that into the fantasy as well? Mr. Butterfly has sex in the Amazon with a native who uses a potion beforehand as a lubricant. Mr. Butterfly was worried because the sex was bareback, and he is HIV+. So he takes a sample of the potion home to the Foundation for Understanding Nature (FUN) where it is analyzed and found to have anti-viral properties. You can guess the rest! I really enjoyed writing the fantasies because I have traveled quite a lot and I could apply my knowledge of the pharmaceutical industry. It also gave me an opportunity to write sexual scenarios that were both gay and straight.

  • Did you ever want to stay anonymous?

    To some extent I am anonymous. This was important to me for my own safety and also to protect my family, some of whom do not approve of my gay porn blog. But I really would like to be out and proud.

  • How did your husband feel about you lusting after these men? And also you putting yourself out there saying you enjoyed watching it?

    At first he was confused and jealous. But he likes and watches porn too! It took him a while to get that it wasn’t a threat to him at all.

    He has always worried about my safety and was very concerned about the virtual world meeting the real world. In other words, when I went out to meet with people that I had only met online for the first time. But I think that now, he pretty much trusts my judgement.

  • Apparently more and more straight women are saying they enjoy watching gay sex, even the one direction fans write fan fiction about the boys sleeping together. What do you think it is, or rather what do you find so attractive about this?

    I think it is for the same reason that I enjoy it. Heterosexual women love men and are turned on by them. They have no interest in women at all. So, once inhibition towards anal sex is conquered, which I believe is easier for straight women than straight men (because by nature women are bottoms), it is free reign to just love gay porn. It is like you mentioned, two men are double the hot! Three men is triple the hot! Straight women and gay men have something in common, we all love cock!

  • Why do you think this is becoming more popular with straight women?

    More straight women are becoming exposed to gay porn and realizing that it is available.

  • Have you noticed an increase in straight women reading your blog?

    Every now and then I get a comment from a woman, but I do not track that aspect at all.

  • Who is your favourite actor and why?

    My first porn crush was Francesco D’Macho. One of my blogger friends called him “sex on legs”. I wrote a fantasy about him and he actually commented on it! I was totally blown away! Since then, I have had other crushes, notably on Pedro Andreas. I still think Pedro is the sexiest man in the business, maybe on the planet. But as far as great actors, I adore Rogan Richards; he is one very talented man.

  • Do you ever meet up with them? Where do you go? (If you could talk about the Grabbys and stuff that would be ace.)
 
Francesco set me up with his friend, Cristiano, to kind of check me out. Cristiano took me to the International Asian Art Fair in NYC. Cristiano is a class act – picked me up in his limo and the whole Asian Art Fair was filled with glitterati. Cristiano knew everybody! I guess I passed muster and so next I met with Francesco and his then fiancee Damien Crosse in NYC where we had dinner. Next thing I knew, I was invited to their wedding in Madrid! Both my husband and I went and it was fabulous! The food was shipped in from Italy and all the men adult entertainers or not, were just as delectable.
 
Typically, if a popular adult entertainer is performing NYC, I will go there to see him where ever the gig is. In that way I have met Steve Cruz, Rogan Richards, Francois Sagat and many more.
 
In addition, I began attending award ceremonies as well as the Folsom Street Fair and International Mr. Leather (IMRL). My first ever award event was the 2010 GAYVNs in San Francisco. I worked the red carpet as a photographer so that I could get in for free. OMG! I thought I had died and gone to heaven; surrounded by beautiful men! I met so many adult entertainers – it felt like I met all of them! What an wonderful experience that was! The Folsom Street Fair was held simultaneously, so I went to that too. I also attended the Grabbys in 2012 and 2013 in Chicago. IMRL is held on the same weekend in May. My blog enabled me to go as press and a photographer so I got into both events for free. I have met so many adult entertainers that I literally cannot keep track. Most of the people I have met are really very nice and sweet. I have hung out with Adam Champ, Alexsander Freitas, Draven Torres, and Diesel Washington; all of whom are very well mannered, intelligent gentlemen that I consider to be friends. Actually, Adam and I were walking back to our hotel from a party late one night in San Francisco, when a drunk stumbled out of a bar and smack into me. I bounced, thank god, but the concern that Adam showed for me is something that I will always treasure. He is a very sincere and loving person. Through my blog I have seen the personal side to many performers. I have tried to share these experiences with my readers. [The easiest way to locate posts on my blog is by using the “Categories” function; click on a category and you will see all of the posts on that item. My blog also has a search function.]
 
As I am disabled, attending these events, and related parties, takes its toll on me, and I usually get sick after going. Also, I pay my own travel expenses, and that limits what I can go to since I live on Social Security Disability, which is pretty much a fixed income. My dream is to go to Hustlaball Berlin! I hear that one can see live sex there! Plus, I could hook up again with my European pals and of course meet tons of new people!
 
I really feel very lucky to have had all of these experiences and my blog has been a large part of my enjoyment in life. I really wish that everyone could experience what I have, see the wonderful people I have met and share what it feels like to be in the gay world.


Michael Turnbull
Editor-in-Chief
Loverboy

www.Loverboymagazine.com
www.Facebook.com/LoverboyMagazine
www.Twitter.com/LoverboyMag

Here is the only time I have been tied up:
Leo Forte was filmed on my iPhone by Draven Torres at the Fort Troff both at International Mr. Leather‘s Leather Market. Here Leo demonstrates the ancient Japanese Shibari rope art to safely secure a wrist 3 different ways:

 

And then on Saturday, May 26, 2012, this happened:

DSC_5800

What I like the most about gay porn is that it provides a fantasy. The adult film actors work very hard to make this fantasy seem real. I have had many fantasies about many different things since I have started watching gay porn. Knowing that these things will never be a reality is a most important fact. I do admit that I have a “kinky” side as far as my interests and fantasies go and in that regard, going to these events and meeting adult actors is like a vaction from reality. But basically, I am a normal heterosexual married woman. I feel that the Loverboy Mag article loses sight of this and makes me more of the story than I would like.

Here are the links that were not published, but that I sent to Michael Turnbull:

suefairview blog:  http://suefairview.com/
Raging stallion studios   http://www.ragingstallion.com/
International Mr. Leather   http://www.imrl.com/
Francois Sagat   http://francoissagat.com/
Folsom Street Fair   http://www.folsomstreetfair.com/

Hustlaball   http://www.hustlaball.com/

I was honored to be styled and photographed by Aaron Cobbett: http://pinkandwrinkly.tumblr.com/. These photos are in the magazine only.

Also, I would like to point out that the protagonist in the Fairview Fantasy is Mr. Butterfly, who is HIV+.