Category: ‘Safe Sex’

My Interview with Loverboy Mag, RAW & UNEDITED

November 20, 2014 Posted by suefairview

I have posted this unedited interview because the one appearing in Loverboy Mag is edited to the extent where my views are lost. 
On Fri, Oct 24, 2014 at 3:06 PM, SueHuybensz <suehuybensz@comcast.net> wrote:

Here is my attempt to answer your questions. I will send links separately.

From: “Michael Turnbull” <michael@loverboymagazine.com>
To: “SueHuybensz” <suehuybensz@comcast.net>
Sent: Thursday, October 23, 2014 4:04:48 AM
Subject: Loverboy questions

Hi Sue,

You ok?
Sorry for the delay in this. You probably thought it was never coming!
Here are the questions. See what you think. Any issues let me know. Please don’t use my real name.

Also tell me what links or info you want underneath. xx

I am honored to be interviewed by Loverboy Magazine. I have always felt that I am not the story, the adult entertainers are the story. But I do get that who I am and what I do is rare, so here we go.
  • Do you want to be called Fairview Sue or Sue Huybensz?

    I prefer to be called Sue Fairview, since that is the url to my blog and people who need to know my real name know what it is.

  • Why ‘Fairview Sue’?

    When I thought of the name, I just knew it was perfect. I really try to be compassionate and fair.

  • Besides your current vocation, you previously worked at a pharmaceutical company trying to find a cure for HIV. Have you always worked in gay-related jobs?

    No, that was my first brush with the gay world, so to speak.

  • Can you tell me about your pharmaceutical job?

    I studied to be a chemist and was thrilled to get a job at big pharma. The company was so big, that I never had to leave to have many careers. I worked as an infectious diseases biochemist, an analytical chemist, a safety coordinator and radiation safety officer, a compliance assurance good clinical practices auditor, in the Oncology clinical research department and as one of two employees helping upper managment to streamline clinical procedures worldwide with regard to lessening the time it takes to study a drug and move it to approval. Whilst in Oncology, in addition to working on some very important, life-saving cancer drugs, I had the wonderful opportunity to work on the second antiretroviral drug to be approved in the USA and Canada in both adults and children. My work began in 1989 and AIDS was a very dire diagnoses back then. The company was the first ever to give drug away for free to almost 70,000 patients as part of an expanded access program. I led a small group of my peers in the monitoring of 100 participating sites and the data was used for the safety portion of the New Drug Application to the Food and Drug Administration. In doing so, I traveled across the country monitoring sites and got to see how AIDS stole the health and lives of young men. It was quite sobering. But I also met many very dedicated physicians and nurses.

    I had another opportunity to work on a chemotherapy for Kaposi’s Sarcoma. The drug was extremely effective and we had total cures with it. I was honored and proud to meet a brave patient who testified at the FDA hearing for that one.

  • Do you have a lot of gay friends? Have you always known a lot of LGBT people?

    I didn’t meet any that I knew of until I worked at big pharma. Of course, all of them were closeted at work, as our company was conservative. I had a very good lesbian friend who had to come out due to discrimination by her boss. I have always felt that LGBT people have a more mature perspective on life in general, since they know firsthand how bigoted and hurtful some people can be and have to shield themselves from that. They are well in touch with reality. To me, the personality of my LGBT friends shone out of them like a bright light.

  • I know there were concerns about running a porn blog, because your local village/town is not necessarily the most liberal place. Was it ok when you were working at the pharmaceutical company? Did they say anything then?

    I did not start the blog until I was disabled. But It would have been scandalous! LOL!

  • What happened when you had your brain aneurysm? Where were you? Did you collapse? How was it diagnosed? Did you need an operation?

    Well, the night before I had just gotten home from a several day seminar in NYC where I was training my peers. I took the train home and had a migraine and was exhausted. I stood in the doorway in my raincoat, with nothing left. The next day was a Friday and I was to be reviewed by my bitch boss, a cardiologist who wanted to “coach” me. Ugh! I felt trapped and that I could not face the morning. I went to bed.

    My husband was awakened by the phone ringing. It was my office saying that I had my review this morning and how come I wasn’t in yet? My husband looked into my room and I was unresponsive and grey. He quickly stated that he had a medical emergency and would get back to them. He then carried me down the stairs and took me to my doctor, who called an ambulance and I was rushed to the local medical center for a brain scan. That scan showed a large brain hemorrhage and I was taken by helicopter to Yale Medical Center. I was diagnosed with a “formidable” arterovenous malformation, a congenital condition. My neuro-vascular surgeon was world renowned in treating this condition – he saved my life. I required 2 brain surgeries, one to drain the clot and one to remove the AVM, and needed two procedures to prepare the AVM for removal. My outcome was truly a miracle. I am in the top 95th percentile of outcomes. I am very thankful for my recovery! More of the trials and tribulations of this experience are documented on my blog under the label “Health” in an 8 post series called “Brush with death”.

  • It obviously left you disabled afterwards. But did it change your work ethic and what you wanted to do with your career?

    My disability was not obvious to me at all, as it was invisible and I felt great. I read Lance Armstrong’s ITS NOT ABOUT THE BIKE for guidance. Your surgeon cures you and then what? I had a terrific outcome, so I went back to work after a 6 month sick leave because my job was so important and beneficial to society. It took 4 tortuous years for me to convince myself that I was disabled. Basically, I had less stamina than before, chronic daily migraines, epilepsy [I had 2 grand mal seizures at work], and far less mental acuity than before to the point that I was useless in my profession. My nearly eidetic memory and typically sharp mental acuity was gone and that, with my knowledge of chemistry drug regulation and medicine, was my value to big pharma. But my expectations for myself had not changed; I was still a type A person, so my work ethic did not change at all.

    But the entire episode gave me so much empathy for others; I had thought that because I worked on cancers and AIDS that I understood that life is short and what suffering is. I learned that it was egotistical of me to think this. It took nearly dying to wake me up to how beautiful a treasure life is, and how quickly it can end.

    Also, spiritually, it changed me. I had had dreams beforehand that I was the Dalai Lama and had great interest in Buddhism. My compassion for others skyrocketed through this experience.

    I was so driven to help people, that I thought about joining the fire department. I actually went on a training run with them and helped cut a roof off of a car. That was so exciting! But I didn’t think that working for the fire department would be good for my health as I needed to keep regular hours. I also tried to start a Gay/Straight Alliance in my local school district, but the person I spoke with said that there were none of that “type” of student in the classes. I tried to explain that the group would also be for straight people and the message would be tolerance so that bullying would be eliminated. But it was a no go. I also tried volunteering for True Colors, a safe-house/mentoring group. But they were based in Hartford, which was too far for me to drive. So, I volunteered at my town’s local library for 6 or so years.

  • When did you realise you enjoyed watching gay porn?

    I have always been a very sexual person and love looking at naked men! It didn’t really start for me until I noticed gay porn stars. Of course, then I wanted to see them in action. Who wouldn’t???? My first gay porn was when I became a reviewer for Stag Homme Studios. I loved their films; they were so freaking hot! Over the years, Stag Homme has developed into quite the creative artists and I feel that they are undervalued as a company. Next was Liberate Studios in South Africa, then LoganMcCree.tv, and finally Raging Stallion Studios. I have never bought commercial porn in my life. I got to be a reviewer for Raging Stallion by writing an email to Bruno Bond when Focus/Refocus was coming out. My email was titled “Ain’t too proud to beg” and I pointed out that I was a huge murder mystery fan and would love to review this movie. I heard back several weeks later that RSS had taken me on as a reviewer! Imagine, reviewing gay porn while watching it! I was in bliss!

  • Is it the lack of a women that you like watching or the idea of two men? Double your money! :)

    Well, I have no sexual interest in women, so why would want to watch porn that has them? The idea of two men is just so hot! I love to watch them kissing and hugging and you know… LOL!

  • Do you ever watch gay porn with your husband?

    Not really. I have shown him some, and he just isn’t into it.

  • How extreme do you like your BDSM? You were saying before you didn’t like clamps, fisting, or watersports. That sounds like you are into more straight female BDSM where it is more erotic than hardcore male sexual fetish. Is that fair?

    Not really. I love the aspect of being tied down. When I was at International Mr. Leather in 2012, I got locked into a kennel. It made me high! I also love floggers. My favorite BDSM movie was RSS Fetish Force’s film Back Alley and my favorite scene was with Leo Forte and Jessie Santana. The review is on the blog. I asked Leo why the movie wasn’t nominated for awards, and he told me that it was too hardcore for the general fans to appreciate. I also don’t mind watching sounding. I don’t like clamps on balls; it looks so painful! But I don’t mind them on other parts of the body.

  • What kind of men are you attracted to? (It’s bears and muscle isn’t it?)

    I adore hairy bodybuilders and a beard just makes it all the more delectable. So, yes please!

  • In which case do you understand the attraction with twinks?

    Absolutely. I have reviewed a couple of twink films and one can forget that they are not bodybuilders and see that they can really know what they are doing. Plus some of them are so beautiful!

  • What made you want to set up your own blog?

    So, there I was, bored and disabled. But I saw a show on tv called America’s Top Male Model. There was a scandal that one of the contestants did some stripping in a gay bar. I researched that online and discovered blogs! I began going to gay blogs everywhere to see the cheesecake as well as porn clips, but really became friends with Brenton Parry of Aussielicious. He is the one that inspired me to start a blog. At first I was just posting excerpts from a book I was writing and then just tidbits of news about myself on my blog. But I quickly noticed that if one posted photos of nude men, one got more traffic. Then later on, I discovered that if one posted photos of cocks, traffic would soar! The most traffic I ever got was 4,000 hits per day. This was severely curtailed when WordPress shut me down for having a gay porn blog. I never have recovered all of those hits plus I lost many photos; some of which I have never recovered. Now I own my domain personally.

  • Tell me about Fairview Fantasies?

    Everyone has sexual fantasies, am I right? Well I had this great idea that two scientists could have fun adventures worldwide. The protagonist was a lepidopterist named Mr. Butterfly; he had a PhD, but why stand on ceremony? His counterpart was Dr. Sue Fairview, a botanist who specialized in orchids. Then I thought that my total fantasy was to cure AIDS, so why not incorporate that into the fantasy as well? Mr. Butterfly has sex in the Amazon with a native who uses a potion beforehand as a lubricant. Mr. Butterfly was worried because the sex was bareback, and he is HIV+. So he takes a sample of the potion home to the Foundation for Understanding Nature (FUN) where it is analyzed and found to have anti-viral properties. You can guess the rest! I really enjoyed writing the fantasies because I have traveled quite a lot and I could apply my knowledge of the pharmaceutical industry. It also gave me an opportunity to write sexual scenarios that were both gay and straight.

  • Did you ever want to stay anonymous?

    To some extent I am anonymous. This was important to me for my own safety and also to protect my family, some of whom do not approve of my gay porn blog. But I really would like to be out and proud.

  • How did your husband feel about you lusting after these men? And also you putting yourself out there saying you enjoyed watching it?

    At first he was confused and jealous. But he likes and watches porn too! It took him a while to get that it wasn’t a threat to him at all.

    He has always worried about my safety and was very concerned about the virtual world meeting the real world. In other words, when I went out to meet with people that I had only met online for the first time. But I think that now, he pretty much trusts my judgement.

  • Apparently more and more straight women are saying they enjoy watching gay sex, even the one direction fans write fan fiction about the boys sleeping together. What do you think it is, or rather what do you find so attractive about this?

    I think it is for the same reason that I enjoy it. Heterosexual women love men and are turned on by them. They have no interest in women at all. So, once inhibition towards anal sex is conquered, which I believe is easier for straight women than straight men (because by nature women are bottoms), it is free reign to just love gay porn. It is like you mentioned, two men are double the hot! Three men is triple the hot! Straight women and gay men have something in common, we all love cock!

  • Why do you think this is becoming more popular with straight women?

    More straight women are becoming exposed to gay porn and realizing that it is available.

  • Have you noticed an increase in straight women reading your blog?

    Every now and then I get a comment from a woman, but I do not track that aspect at all.

  • Who is your favourite actor and why?

    My first porn crush was Francesco D’Macho. One of my blogger friends called him “sex on legs”. I wrote a fantasy about him and he actually commented on it! I was totally blown away! Since then, I have had other crushes, notably on Pedro Andreas. I still think Pedro is the sexiest man in the business, maybe on the planet. But as far as great actors, I adore Rogan Richards; he is one very talented man.

  • Do you ever meet up with them? Where do you go? (If you could talk about the Grabbys and stuff that would be ace.)
 
Francesco set me up with his friend, Cristiano, to kind of check me out. Cristiano took me to the International Asian Art Fair in NYC. Cristiano is a class act – picked me up in his limo and the whole Asian Art Fair was filled with glitterati. Cristiano knew everybody! I guess I passed muster and so next I met with Francesco and his then fiancee Damien Crosse in NYC where we had dinner. Next thing I knew, I was invited to their wedding in Madrid! Both my husband and I went and it was fabulous! The food was shipped in from Italy and all the men adult entertainers or not, were just as delectable.
 
Typically, if a popular adult entertainer is performing NYC, I will go there to see him where ever the gig is. In that way I have met Steve Cruz, Rogan Richards, Francois Sagat and many more.
 
In addition, I began attending award ceremonies as well as the Folsom Street Fair and International Mr. Leather (IMRL). My first ever award event was the 2010 GAYVNs in San Francisco. I worked the red carpet as a photographer so that I could get in for free. OMG! I thought I had died and gone to heaven; surrounded by beautiful men! I met so many adult entertainers – it felt like I met all of them! What an wonderful experience that was! The Folsom Street Fair was held simultaneously, so I went to that too. I also attended the Grabbys in 2012 and 2013 in Chicago. IMRL is held on the same weekend in May. My blog enabled me to go as press and a photographer so I got into both events for free. I have met so many adult entertainers that I literally cannot keep track. Most of the people I have met are really very nice and sweet. I have hung out with Adam Champ, Alexsander Freitas, Draven Torres, and Diesel Washington; all of whom are very well mannered, intelligent gentlemen that I consider to be friends. Actually, Adam and I were walking back to our hotel from a party late one night in San Francisco, when a drunk stumbled out of a bar and smack into me. I bounced, thank god, but the concern that Adam showed for me is something that I will always treasure. He is a very sincere and loving person. Through my blog I have seen the personal side to many performers. I have tried to share these experiences with my readers. [The easiest way to locate posts on my blog is by using the “Categories” function; click on a category and you will see all of the posts on that item. My blog also has a search function.]
 
As I am disabled, attending these events, and related parties, takes its toll on me, and I usually get sick after going. Also, I pay my own travel expenses, and that limits what I can go to since I live on Social Security Disability, which is pretty much a fixed income. My dream is to go to Hustlaball Berlin! I hear that one can see live sex there! Plus, I could hook up again with my European pals and of course meet tons of new people!
 
I really feel very lucky to have had all of these experiences and my blog has been a large part of my enjoyment in life. I really wish that everyone could experience what I have, see the wonderful people I have met and share what it feels like to be in the gay world.


Michael Turnbull
Editor-in-Chief
Loverboy

www.Loverboymagazine.com
www.Facebook.com/LoverboyMagazine
www.Twitter.com/LoverboyMag

Here is the only time I have been tied up:
Leo Forte was filmed on my iPhone by Draven Torres at the Fort Troff both at International Mr. Leather‘s Leather Market. Here Leo demonstrates the ancient Japanese Shibari rope art to safely secure a wrist 3 different ways:

 

And then on Saturday, May 26, 2012, this happened:

DSC_5800

What I like the most about gay porn is that it provides a fantasy. The adult film actors work very hard to make this fantasy seem real. I have had many fantasies about many different things since I have started watching gay porn. Knowing that these things will never be a reality is a most important fact. I do admit that I have a “kinky” side as far as my interests and fantasies go and in that regard, going to these events and meeting adult actors is like a vaction from reality. But basically, I am a normal heterosexual married woman. I feel that the Loverboy Mag article loses sight of this and makes me more of the story than I would like.

Here are the links that were not published, but that I sent to Michael Turnbull:

suefairview blog:  http://suefairview.com/
Raging stallion studios   http://www.ragingstallion.com/
International Mr. Leather   http://www.imrl.com/
Francois Sagat   http://francoissagat.com/
Folsom Street Fair   http://www.folsomstreetfair.com/

Hustlaball   http://www.hustlaball.com/

I was honored to be styled and photographed by Aaron Cobbett: http://pinkandwrinkly.tumblr.com/. These photos are in the magazine only.

Also, I would like to point out that the protagonist in the Fairview Fantasy is Mr. Butterfly, who is HIV+.

 

Gay American Men Shockingly Ignorant About HIV/AIDS, Kaiser Study Finds

October 13, 2014 Posted by suefairview

An article in the Huffington Post by

“A Kaiser Family Foundation survey of what gay American men know and how we behave when it comes to HIV shows a stunning level of ignorance and denial 33 years since the virus began to kill extraordinary numbers of us.

More distressing than the profound lack of knowledge about HIV/AIDS among the 431 adult men who participated in the survey is the fact that it reveals a startling failure — even an absence — of HIV education among gay and bisexual men, despite the fact that we account for the nation’s highest number of those living with or at risk for HIV.

The survey found that only a third of the men knew that HIV infections are increasing among gay men. Meanwhile, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that one in five people who are already infected doesn’t know his or her HIV status.

Gay men of color were the most informed. Not coincidentally, they are also more likely than white gay men to see HIV/AIDS as a personally significant issue. This makes sense, since there is a far higher rate of HIV in African-American and Latino communities than among Caucasians. Men of color also are far more likely than white men — 61 percent vs. 39 percent — to consistently use condoms in anal intercourse.

A quarter of the survey respondents said they never use condoms at all.

Not even half the men (46 percent) knew that doctors recommend that people who are newly diagnosed with HIV begin antiretroviral therapy immediately. Research shows that suppressing HIV as soon after infection as possible is key to successfully managing it over a potentially normal lifespan. On the other hand, untreated HIV is still deadly — as more than 1 million AIDS deaths worldwide demonstrate each year.

Yet, according to the CDC, only an estimated 28 percent of Americans who know they have HIV are on antiretroviral therapy.

It’s startling to realize that 56 percent of the men surveyed said a doctor has never recommended that they get tested for HIV. But then it’s not so surprising when we also find out that 47 percent of the men said they’ve never discussed their sexual orientation with a doctor or other healthcare professional.

Dear gay and bisexual men, how do you expect your doctor to be able to protect your health if you don’t provide him or her with this essential piece of information?

Dear doctors, why are you not proactively and non-judgmentally inquiring about sexual or substance-using behavior that could be undermining your effort to support your patient’s health?

The level of ignorance and denial among American gay men is the result of the federal government not targeting the bulk of public HIV-prevention funding for programs aimed at those who are at greatest risk: gay and bisexual men.

It’s the result of the LGBT community’s leadership “moving on” to marriage equality and forgetting that the right to good personal and public health is even more fundamental than the right to marry.

Finally, it’s what happens when individuals don’t bother to inform themselves, don’t “bring it up” with their friends, don’t think it’s “relevant” to let their doctors know they have sex with men — let alone discuss specific sexual practices that could put them at risk.

HIV/AIDS has been a massive issue for gay America for 33 years. There is no excuse not to be up-to-date on what has been done, what needs to be done, and how to do your own part to protect your health and the health of our community.

The Kaiser survey suggests that three important changes need to be made if we are going to see HIV rates among American gay men drop:

  1. The feds must shift the bulk of taxpayer-supported HIV-prevention dollars to support targeted and explicit programs aimed at gay and bisexual men — those at greatest risk for HIV — including campaigns focused on motivating men to get tested and know their HIV status, stay HIV-negative, and get treatment immediately if they are HIV-positive.
  2. It’s time for gay America to reclaim our powerful history of leading the way on HIV/AIDS. This means making educating gay and bisexual men of all ages and colors a priority, equipping us with the information we need — in terms we understand — to support our health.
  3. We are responsible for our own health. If equality means anything, it has to start within ourselves. This means believing, and behaving as though we believe, that we are equally entitled to good health.

The most powerful gay liberation movement we could ever launch would be to liberate ourselves from the many harms that ignorance can inflict on us. The movement’s success starts with each one of us making healthful choices. The first step forward is to know your own HIV status.

Knowledge is power, and silence — ignorance — still can mean death.”

[snip]

The full article is here. Bolding is mine.

I am bummed.

September 16, 2014 Posted by suefairview

First let me explain my credentials to discuss the issue of condom versus bare back sex in porn.

I worked for 22 years at big pharma, some of it in the lab as a chemist, some of it as a safety coordinator, some as a clinical research auditor, and some as a clinical research protocol manager. During that time, I worked on all phases of clinical trials that led to the final approval of a novel antiretroviral therapy. I also worked on an anticancer agent to fight Kaposi’s Sarcoma. I had dedicated my life to fighting HIV and cancer. Unfortunately, this all ended after my brain hemorrhage disabled me.

During the time I was working on the antiretroviral therapy, I traveled across the country and saw very disturbing things. I saw men [some women and children also] who were being robbed of their lives by AIDS and its related illnesses. I saw people who could not walk across the room and were blue with lack of oxygen in their blood due to AIDS related anemia. I saw people covered in Kaposi’s lesions, which along with the accompanying edema crippled them. I saw patients who were on oxygen because of pneumocystis pneumonia.  I could go on and on with the scary instances of concomitant illnesses common in AIDS patients. Back then, AIDS was a death sentence. I saw brave patients go with us to the FDA to plead for drug approvals, which we were fortunate enough to obtain.

Young people, through no fault of their own, have no idea how terrible AIDS can be as they didn’t live through that time. Some people think, “Oh, if I find that I am HIV+, I will just take some pills and be okay.” But think a minute about that. How many pills? [And they will be for the rest of your life.] What will they cost? How will you pay for them? How much will you worry at every cough that you have? Or worry with any symptom that you have? Of course, you may be immunosuppressed as well, and therefore have increased susceptibility to other diseases, including STD’s. I have suffered with a chronic illness and complying with the medication is not easy and can be depressing. From thereon forward, you will be HIV+, and need to take precautions such as telling your sexual partners that you are positive and having regular blood testing for CD4 counts and HIV levels. And of course as you get older, being HIV+ can complicate diseases of aging. Oh, and did I mention the possible side effects of HIV therapies that you will have to tolerate for the rest of your life?

Yes, I mean to scare you.

I was also a safety coordinator for about 600 employees. At big pharma we worked with all kinds of infectious diseases [including HIV] as well as toxic and radioactive chemicals. We followed OSHA and NRC procedures and were audited for same. I personally maintained records of exposure to radiation for every employee who worked with it, as was required by regulation. I also maintained accident records for the site. I did laboratory inspections and made reports. I headed both the safety and radiation safety committees and in this capacity, wrote safety procedures to improve our safety and standards.

So, my views of safe versus unsafe sex are formed by these experiences in the scientific, medical and professional safety capacities.

I  have been reviewing gay pornography since 2008. Of course I adore gay porn!!!! I thought that my blog would be a good way to spread the message that safe sex is hot sex.

In the past year or two however, many of my industry friends have opted to the bare backing scene. I too have been approached by studios who have bareback sex for reviews and promotion and I have always said “No thank you”. A well known director who has won awards told me in confidence that he believed that studios in the future would all be bareback.

My opinion is that what one does at home is one’s own business. But once a sex worker steps into a studio, that employee’s safety should be protected by the employer. Period. It is totally a question of employee safety in my mind. The entire freedom of speech argument is a non-sequitor and illogical. The studio is a workplace; the employee is given instructions to follow by the employer. It is all a question of safety. I could not go into big pharma and say whatever I wanted for fear of being fired. Or, I could not choose not to follow safety requirements because of free speech. I would be at risk of being fired. Plus I could endanger fellow employees and the property. Using condoms in porn is the only known way to protect employees from HIV and STD’s.

When AB1576 was introduced in California, I was hopeful! Finally condoms would be required in porn in California.

Resistance was fierce. Most of it was for financial reasons though; never a good slant for safety. I could recount many times that safety was sacrificed for the almighty dollar.

It was true though that sex workers’ records would have to be maintained at the studio under AB1576. But this was never a problem at our company. Personal information was kept confidential at all costs. A responsible employee would not have trouble with doing this. Also, there would be no need to sero-sort performers who were using condoms. If bare backing companies are sero-sorting, don’t they already have personal medical information? Why isn’t it a problem if BB studios do it, but as soon as it is done for safe sex, privacy is an issue.

Unfortunately, the bill failed. That is why I am so bummed.

I am against bare backing because of my concern for employee safety and also because I believe that influenceable viewers may copy what they see their favorite porn star doing on-screen. The CDC reports that HIV infections are up in the US. Infection rates are also up in Europe and Asia. Here is another article on the matter. Though no scientific study has proven the association to be true I feel the association is a no-brainer. Besides, shouldn’t we err on the side of safety?

I feel that the real heroes of this story are those sex workers who refuse to take the bigger paycheck that bare backing offers, which can easily be more than $1,000 per scene plus airfare. For many of these people, that is a huge amount of money. Also worthy of note are the studios that refuse to go to raw sex, even given the greater financial rewards available.

Part of the problem is that the porn market is changing and salaries are far lower than they were in the past for sex workers. At one time, a sex worker would earn $2,000 per scene, now that has dropped to $400 to $600. Plus amenities such as airfare are not paid out anymore.

All of these problems could be solved if there was a sex worker union formed. Salaries are determined by unions as are worker safety standards. But forming a sex worker union is quite problematic when escorting is not legal in many states. Even if it was, still the organizing and signing up of sex workers would be a monumental task.

So, I am bummed. Majorly. I have lost interest in doing reviews and even in watching porn altogether.

All I can say is that if you are a sex worker who is bare backing, take Truvada. It should protect you from sero-converting if you can tolerate it. Unfortunately it will not protect you from other STD’s.

California’s Condoms in Porn Bill (AB 1576) Clears Senate Labor Committee

June 25, 2014 Posted by suefairview

This story is from the Digital Journal:

AHF: With Three Votes, California’s Condoms in Porn Bill (AB 1576) Clears Senate Labor Committee

Read the rest of the article here.

Response to the Sword’s “10 reasons for gay porn stars to be more angry, and scared, about AB1576″

June 20, 2014 Posted by suefairview

Here is the link to the article at the Sword. Read AB 1576 here.

I will respond on a point-by-point basis.

1. It’s a solution to a problem that’s non-existent
In the last nine years there have been zero reports of HIV transmission on adult film sets. And where was the state, and Cal/OSHA, back at the height of the HIV/AIDS epidemic in the 1980s when porn studios were shooting bareback without acknowledging the risks of HIV transmission? We’re talking about tackling a problem 30 years too late that isn’t even a problem anymore — setting aside the example of Treasure Island Media which pretends to flout the notion of HIV safety, even though, anecdotally, they do sero-sort. Semi-monthly testing is already mandatory for all active performers. Also, Truvada is making the condom issue even more of a moot point for gay men, as long as its taken properly.

Untrue! There have been at least 2 reports of HIV transmission on adult film sets; both Cameron Bay and Rod Daily became infected and seroconverted to HIV+, respectively, in August of 2013 [http://www.aidshealth.org/archives/18040] and both men testified in support of this bill. More infections are alluded to in the discussion of the bill. The second point about “this legislation is too late” is irrelevant to the core argument. Besides, if it would have been helpful earlier, why isn’t it helpful now? When the bill is enacted, semi-monthly testing will be required at all studios. Truvada is also irrelevant to the core argument because patient compliance is dependent on the individual and cannot be relied on without testing.

2. The bill will move the industry out of state, at least at first, and possibly overseas.
That means that a performer who comes to San Francisco for a week to shoot for five studios will probably end up doing a lot more traveling to get the same amount of work. And since budgets are already low, we’ll likely see a decrease in jobs available overall. In the wake of the passage of Measure B in L.A., a bunch of straight porn companies have already relocated to Nevada.

Only barebacking studios will be forced to move; not companies who are currently using condoms who should be able to comply with the bill easily.

3. AB1576 removes the element of choice from performers.
For HIV-negative gay models, this means they will no longer be able to perform with HIV-positive models with protection should they choose too, further stigmatizing a disease the industry has long learned how to deal with.

Untrue! The bill does not state this anywhere. Nothing will change in this regard.

4. The entire thing is poorly written, disease-shaming, and not well thought out.
As Habib points out, “The language of the bill also utterly ignores people who are already living with HIV. There’s no structure in place to protect HIV+ performers from being blacklisted… The bill would also require two HIV+ men to get tested and used condoms if they wanted to do a scene together. That’s lunacy.”

The bill is not disease shaming. Please point out where this is for me. I don’t see it anywhere and this is the second time you have claimed this. This bill is written in the form and language of all regulations and thus might be considered poorly written by other authors, but then all regulations are! The language is clear and understandable, plus can be held legally binding. This is what is desired in regulatory bills. Blacklisting point: The studio will keep confidentiality by assigning a responsible person to keep the records. This will mean that HIV status will remain unknown to everyone, just like it is now. BTW: Where is the link to Conner Habib‘s statement? You did not provide it and I couldn’t find it on his blog.

5. Anyone producing content on their own, and not abiding by the letter of the law, could go to jail.
The law would also criminalize any adult production that violates its tenets — so you might actually see some performers, particularly those who are involved in production in some way, or shoot a sex tape, or doing webcam work — going to jail.

The potential for incarceration reflects how important an offense like HIV transmission is to the State. I do not feel that incarceration is too much punishment for someone who risks infecting another individual with HIV. Do you?

6. The law would present extremely serious violations to privacy around HIV
Companies would be required to report positive test results to the state, but there’s no language addressing confidentiality in these results, and nothing preventing insurance companies from finding out results or penalizing those found to be HIV+, who were able to keep their status confidential in the past.

Studios will have to take responsibility in this area and protect their employees’ privacy. Employee privacy is already being protected all over the country in areas such as Radiation Safety and for those who work with blood bourne pathogens [https://www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owadisp.show_document?p_id=10051&p_table=STANDARDS]. Regulations in California are here [http://www.documentcloud.org/documents/855249-california-code-of-regulations-title-8-section.html]. Thousands of private corporations and health management concerns are dealing with these type of regulatory standards without issues pertaining to privacy. Thus, there should be no change from the previous situation as far as loss of privacy.

7. AB 1576 doesn’t even understand how the industry works.
Assembly member Isadore Hall, who helped craft the bill, seems to believe that porn performers are all employees of their respective companies, when by and large they are all independent contractors.

I fail to see why this makes any difference. Information might need to be shared across studios between the caretakers of records, that is all.

8. Michael Weinstein is a self-aggrandizing, panic-mongering fool.
We’ve said it before, but this asshole behind the AIDS Healthcare Foundation would have us all believe that Truvada is a sham, and all sluts should be shamed.

This point is irrelevant to the discussion of AB 1576.

9. Many of your favorite porn stars will disappear from the screen, and be outed as HIV+.
Fan should all know by now that many performers on the gay side of the industry are HIV+, and they perform, safely and with condoms, with HIV-negative and other positive performers. AB1576 will essentially create a witch hunt for these performers, and out them by virtue of their sudden absence from the industry.

Totally untrue! The bill says nothing about changing HIV+ performers’ participation in the industry. Their participation can continue so long as they use condoms.

10. The bill is framed like an anti-porn crusade, and lots of respectable organizations have come out against it, as well as over 1,000 performers signing this petition.
If you don’t trust me, then listen to the Harvey Milk Democratic Club, the Transgender Law Center, the St. James Infirmary, the Erotic Service Providers Union, the Center for Sex and Culture, and the Adult Performers Advocacy Committee.

Where and how is the bill “like and anti-porn crusade”? How come you haven’t provided links to these organizations who are purportedly against AB 1576? The bill will require more work in the record-keeping sense as well as for studios to spend more on some beneficial things for its models. Let us keep in mind that no industries like more regulation, whether it benefits the environment or employees. I see no difference in the case of this legislation.

All I see is fear-mongering on behalf of the Sword towards this beneficial new regulation which will attempts to ensure the safety of employees in the adult entertainment industry.

Read an in-depth discussion of these and more points for and against the bill here. The document lists supporters of the bill as:

  • AIDS Healthcare Foundation
  • American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists
  • Beyond AIDS California Academy of Preventive Medicine
  • California Communities United Institute
  • California Employment Lawyers Association
  • California Medical Association
  • California Public Health Association-North
  • California State Association of Occupational Health
  • Nurses Fielding School of Public Health, UCLA
  • National Coalition of STD Directors
  • Planned Parenthood Affiliates of California
  • Professor Jeffrey Klausner of Medicine and Public Health, UCLA Worksafe

Opponents were:

  • Cutting Edge Testing
  • Free Speech Coalition
  • Ireland Entertainment
  • Manwin USA
  • Sean Darcy, MD Professional Corporation
  • Unsound Labs
  • Valley Industry and Commerce Association
  • Vivid Entertainment, LLC

BOTTOM LINE

Make your own informed decision as to the whether or not the bill is any good. Please don’t just read the Sword; this is only a one-sided discussion of the bill by a person with no apparent regulatory or corporate experience in safety matters. Further, I find the writing of his article irresponsible, since the author should state upfront that he is a crony of the porn industry and thus has his own agenda.

Cameron Bay, adult film performer who became infected with HIV while working in the adult industry in August 2013

·       Rod Daily, adult film performer who became HIV positive while working in the adult industry in August 2013

– See more at: http://www.aidshealth.org/archives/18040#sthash.X8tmqs8q.dpuf

Cameron Bay, adult film performer who became infected with HIV while working in the adult industry in August 2013

·       Rod Daily, adult film performer who became HIV positive while working in the adult industry in August 2013

– See more at: http://www.aidshealth.org/archives/18040#sthash.X8tmqs8q.dpuf

Cameron Bay, adult film performer who became infected with HIV while working in the adult industry in August 2013

·       Rod Daily, adult film performer who became HIV positive while working in the adult industry in August 2013

– See more at: http://www.aidshealth.org/archives/18040#sthash.X8tmqs8q.dpuf